Marine LifePredators

Diver Mauled By Man-Eating Super Squid

For centuries, sailors have told stories of large ferocious  creatures they encountered while at sea, most intelligent folks put these stories down as fantasy, the bi-product of an over active imagination, told by a drunken sailor.

But as time and technology have marched on since Columbus sailed to the New World in 1492, we are finding-out that yes…there are real honest-to-goodness “sea monsters” out there.  Creatures that surely can make short work of a man who is careless enough to cross their path.

The Humboldt squid is a large squid that lives throughout the eastern Pacific Ocean. It is named after an explorer who visited that region at the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries and is also often called the jumbo squid, as a result of its size.

Like many squids, the Humboldt squid grows rapidly and likely lives for only a single year.  During that time, it reaches its maximum size, reproduces multiple times, and dies.

Humboldt squid reproduce via internal fertilization and lay large egg masses of at least one million eggs.  In their short lifetime, females may lay as many as 20 million eggs, the most of any known cephalopod (squid, octopus, or relative).  After they hatch, Humboldt squid grow from about one millimeter to well over a meter in just one year.

To support a growth rate that high, Humboldt squid are voracious predators and have been known to decimate populations of small fishes or smaller squids when their numbers explode.  Several species prey on this Humboldt squid throughout the many life history stages, but adults are a favorite food of sperm whales, bill-fishes, and other very large predators.

The diver in the video below found-out the hard way, that these animals are extremely dangerous and he was lucky to escape with his life (and all of his limbs) intact.

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If You're On Vacation In Costa Rica You Don't Ever Want To Meet Up With This Snake

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Watch As A Marine 50 Cal Gunner Engages Taliban Positions During Ambush In The Sangin Valley