VideoWildlife

Snapping Turtle Attacks With Lightning Speed

This turtle is fast…and I mean lightning fast, I suppose it’s only human nature to be curious, but sometimes that could also be a detriment. When an animal has the name “Snapping Turtle”, you can be pretty sure that it doesn’t refer to the animals sunny disposition. One of the first things that you’ll notice right away about this video,  is that the turtle wasn’t bothering anyone.

Apparently, the guy that shot this video saw the animal in his driveway and decided to get a closer look…that was his first mistake. It’s painfully obvious to the most casual observer, that the turtle wants to be left the heck alone. But, whether it was just  plain curiosity on the man’s part, or, that he just couldn’t leave well enough alone, the turtle sends a clear message to the man. And that message is: “Leave me alone, or I’ll bite your face off !”.  But apparently the mental midget didn’t quite understand the warning and near the end of the video…he get’s whats coming to him. I’ll bet he won’t try that again. I think it’s safe to say, that the guy was pretty lucky that it wasn’t a Grizzly bear in front of him, otherwise he’d be on the inside looking out.

Wikipedia has this to say about the Common Snaping Turtle:

The common snapping turtle is noted for its combative disposition when out of the water with its powerful beak-like jaws, and highly mobile head and neck (hence the specific name serpentina, meaning “snake-like”). In water, they are likely to flee and hide themselves underwater in sediment. Snapping turtles have a life-history strategy characterized by high and variable mortality of embryos and hatchlings, delayed sexual maturity, extended adult longevity, and iteroparity (repeated reproductive events) with low reproductive success per reproductive event. Females, and presumably also males, in more northern populations mature later (at 15–20 years) and at a larger size than in more southern populations (about 12 years). Lifespan in the wild is poorly known, but long-term mark-recapture data from Algonquin Park in Ontario, Canada, suggest a maximum age over 100 years.

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